Category Archives: issue no. 3

Introduction: Science Fiction and the Feminist Present

“The boundary between science fiction and social reality is an optical illusion” (149). So Donna Haraway wrote in 1985 in “A Cyborg Manifesto.” When I composed a call for papers around this evocative line, I hoped to solicit work that would address the continuities and the transformations between the chimeric time of Haraway’s 1980s and … Continue reading Introduction: Science Fiction and the Feminist Present

“Shaping God”: The Power of Octavia Butler’s Black Feminist and Womanist SciFi Visions in the Shaping of a New world – An Interview with Adrienne Maree Brown

  Audio transcript available here “God is Change.” These are the captivating introductory words to the Earthseed sacred text, The Book of the Living. Bourne of the prophetic mind of Octavia Butler, this lasting truth is but one example of the visionary themes that populate her narratives. The works of science fiction writer Octavia Butler … Continue reading “Shaping God”: The Power of Octavia Butler’s Black Feminist and Womanist SciFi Visions in the Shaping of a New world – An Interview with Adrienne Maree Brown

Science Fiction Feminisms, Feminist Science Fictions & Feminist Sustainability

Introduction The hospitality of Ada and Ada’s audiences is necessary to this essay. We offer our scholarly play among trans-spatial and trans-temporal webs and platforms as a practice of anticipation and even a quite serious fun that values not-quite-being-yet in sync, writing wise or conclusion wise. We quite like this demonstration of a collaboration that … Continue reading Science Fiction Feminisms, Feminist Science Fictions & Feminist Sustainability

Somatic Capitalism: Reproduction, Futurity, and Feminist Science Fiction

“Every technology is reproductive technology,” -Donna Haraway Reproductive futurism in the neoliberal present Suddenly, it feels a lot like 1984—not the iconic 1984 of Orwell’s dystopia, but the 1984 in which Margaret Atwood composed The Handmaid’s Tale. This was the same year that saw the release of the anti-abortion film The Silent Scream, and only … Continue reading Somatic Capitalism: Reproduction, Futurity, and Feminist Science Fiction

A Curious Doubled Existence: Birth Here and in Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan Saga

Lois McMaster Bujold’s science fiction (SF) relies on the symbiotic relationship between the technological and the social. This is often illustrated by the tension between the scientific and medicalized process of reproduction (via uterine replicators, cloning, and genetic modification) and the primal, ‘natural’ process. Varied levels of technological advancement and associated societal changes across the … Continue reading A Curious Doubled Existence: Birth Here and in Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan Saga

Toward a Zombie Epistemology: What it Means to Live and Die in Cabin in the Woods

Cabin in the Woods (dir. Joss Whedon, 2012) begins with fertility. The movie opens in the middle of the most banal of office scenes, with two white-shirted white men futzing around in a break room. Hadley complains about his ongoing conflict with his partner over their potential child, while Sitterson extracts a coffee from a … Continue reading Toward a Zombie Epistemology: What it Means to Live and Die in Cabin in the Woods

From Lab to Living Room: Transhumanist Imaginaries of Consumer Brain Wave Monitors

Introduction Advances in small components manufacturing have recently given rise to smallindustries offering a range of biometric devices to consumers, researchers, and DIY or “do-it-yourself” communities. These devices now include EEG (electroencephalography) or brain wave monitors, marketed as easily accessible, user friendly, affordable equipment, for use by broad markets of users in research, health care … Continue reading From Lab to Living Room: Transhumanist Imaginaries of Consumer Brain Wave Monitors

Creating Room For A Singularity of Our Own: Reading Sue Lange’s “We, Robots”

The Singularity will allow us to transcend these limitations [involving the rapid increase in intelligence] of our biological bodies and brains. . . . There will be no distinction post-Singularity between human and machine—Ray Kurzweil, The Singularity Is Near, (9) What’s it been three, four years, since the Regularity? The Regularity. When everything became regular, … Continue reading Creating Room For A Singularity of Our Own: Reading Sue Lange’s “We, Robots”

Emmy Noether, Maria Goeppert Mayer, and their Cyborgian Counterparts: Triangulating Mathematical-Theoretical Physics, Feminist Science Studies, and Feminist Science Fiction

Accompanying Materials Methodology & Intellectual Context Biography of Noether Biography of Goeppert Mayer On Speculative Science Fiction Epilog This essay contains a portmanteau of two strands of narratives from which the reader can choose his or her own critical engagement; either biographical or literary. The science fiction aspect of the narrative attempts a critique of … Continue reading Emmy Noether, Maria Goeppert Mayer, and their Cyborgian Counterparts: Triangulating Mathematical-Theoretical Physics, Feminist Science Studies, and Feminist Science Fiction

Queer Urban Composites: Any City or ‘Bellona (After Samuel R. Delany)’

…the way anywhere in this city, Kidd realized, was obviously to drift. -Samuel R. Delany, Dhalgren The “Arts” section editors of The New York Times publish a regular feature, which both lists and reviews shows running at the numerous galleries in New York City. For approximately one year (late 2005-2006), I informally logged this index … Continue reading Queer Urban Composites: Any City or ‘Bellona (After Samuel R. Delany)’

The Cyborg in the Basement Manifesto, or, A Frankenstein of One’s Own: How I Stopped Hunting for Cyborgs and Created the Slightly Irregular Definition of Cyborgean Forms of Storytelling

One need not be a chamber to be haunted, One need not be a house; The brain has corridors surpassing Material place. –Emily Dickinson There was a hand-scrawled sign that read “sold” on the dollhouse at the thrift store. Under a decade layer of attic dust, the shell of a dollhouse had been built, but … Continue reading The Cyborg in the Basement Manifesto, or, A Frankenstein of One’s Own: How I Stopped Hunting for Cyborgs and Created the Slightly Irregular Definition of Cyborgean Forms of Storytelling

Excerpts from Reading Frankenstein: Mary Shelley As 21st Century Artificial Life Scientist

Whence, I often asked myself, did the principle of life proceed? It was a bold question, and one which has ever been considered a mystery; yet with how many things are we on the brink of becoming acquainted, if cowardice or carelessness did not restrain our inquiries? –Mary Shelley, Frankenstein Introduction Reading Frankenstein was an intermedia performance … Continue reading Excerpts from Reading Frankenstein: Mary Shelley As 21st Century Artificial Life Scientist

SF: Science Fiction, Speculative Fabulation, String Figures, So Far

Thanks are due to Donna Haraway and the Science Fiction Research Association for their kind permission to reproduce this speech. To say I am astounded to receive the Pilgrim Award from the SFRA would be an understatement, as well as an acknowledgment of the Astounding heritage from science fiction and its people that makes me … Continue reading SF: Science Fiction, Speculative Fabulation, String Figures, So Far