Tag Archives: peer reviewed

Articles tags peer-reviewed have been reviewed through Ada’s open peer review process.

Radical Imagination And The Left Hand of Darkness

Abstract: “Radical Imagination and The Left Hand of Darkness” considers creative practice as crucial in the process of world building. Looking to Ursula K. Le Guin as a model for imagination as a radical practice we find that the critical question is how we proceed as our failures become clear.   Imagining is a radical practice. … Continue reading Radical Imagination And The Left Hand of Darkness

Communizing Care in The Left Hand Of Darkness

Abstract: In this essay I combine a reading of The Left Hand of Darkness with autobiographical accounts of queer/trans reproduction and childrearing. Contrasting my own experiments in “50/50” parenting with the vision of care elaborated in the novel, I draw attention to the importance of caring labor to radical queer and trans politics more generally. … Continue reading Communizing Care in The Left Hand Of Darkness

Imagining a Trans World

Abstract: Le Guin’s work is well known as a foundation of feminist science fiction’s analysis of gender. But can contemporary readers understand The Left Hand of Darkness as a transgender text? To demonstrate what is gained by reading trans authors, I offer my own series of poems, Pregnancy, as an example.   Le Guin’s Thought … Continue reading Imagining a Trans World

Instantiating Imaginactivism: Le Guin’s The Dispossessed as Inspiration

Abstract: This article introduces the concept of imaginactivism to investigate the ways in which interpretive and activist communities are formed, inspired and reinvigorated by fictional cultural production. Several instantiations of imaginactivism, including a film pitch, a collection of short stories, and a panel organized for the Tiptree Symposium are discussed.   Introduction When the planning … Continue reading Instantiating Imaginactivism: Le Guin’s The Dispossessed as Inspiration

The Technopo(e)litics of Rupi Kaur: (de)Colonial AestheTics and Spatial Narrations in the DigiFemme Age

Abstract: Rupi Kaur, a trending poetess of Instagram, has recently gained critical acclaim online for her newly published poetry collection milk and honey which is a stunning depiction of trauma, survival, love, womanhood, and friendship. Identifying as a first-generation Canadian, Punjabi-Sikh, woman of color, Kaur works visually in her book and on Instagram to portray and subvert … Continue reading The Technopo(e)litics of Rupi Kaur: (de)Colonial AestheTics and Spatial Narrations in the DigiFemme Age

Naive Meritocracy and the Meanings of Myth

Abstract: Hackers and other geeks have long described their spaces as meritocratic. Geek feminists challenge this belief as a myth. In short, so-called meritocracies reproduce extant members and favor incidental attributes; they are biased, susceptible to privilege, and unconcerned with inequitable outcomes. I agree that meritocratic claims are often unfounded and elide equitable opportunities and … Continue reading Naive Meritocracy and the Meanings of Myth

Thinking Beyond ‘Free Speech’ in Responding to Online Harassment

Abstract: Online harassment is a significant problem, and an important movement has emerged in response. However, this activism usually refers back to free speech discourse. I argue that an intersectional approach requires us to explore a more radical rethinking of the political traditions we draw on when responding to online harassment. Online harassment is a … Continue reading Thinking Beyond ‘Free Speech’ in Responding to Online Harassment

Dismantling ‘You Get What You Deserve’: Towards a Feminist Sociology of Revenge Porn

Abstract: With this research, we seek to formulate a feminist sociology of revenge porn, defined as the non-consensual circulation of intimate images with the intent to harm, to bring together two existing explanations for critical interrogation: that revenge porn is a gendered crime that disproportionately affects women and that these women get what they deserve. … Continue reading Dismantling ‘You Get What You Deserve’: Towards a Feminist Sociology of Revenge Porn

Black Deaths Matter? Sousveillance and the Invisibility of Black Life

Abstract: This article examines the shooting of Philando Castile, and his girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds’, decision to film his death at the hands of the police, in order to explore the potential of live-streaming applications as a form of “sousveillance” that can expose white supremacy from below. In highlighting the political economy constraints that limit the … Continue reading Black Deaths Matter? Sousveillance and the Invisibility of Black Life

Black Beauty and Digital Spaces: The New Visibility Politics

Abstract: Less than a year after the creation of the viral hashtag #BlackLivesMatter, an equally catchy and politically charged slogan surfaced: #BlackGirlMagic.  This latest hashtag insists on making black women’s bodies both visible and legible in contexts of beauty, desirability, and dignity. However, more needs to be said about how digital spaces have reified the … Continue reading Black Beauty and Digital Spaces: The New Visibility Politics

Sisters Rap the Blues: Examining the Perceived Impact of Rap Music on Black Women College Students

Abstract: The following qualitative study examines how Black women college students enrolled at a Predominately White Institution (PWI) perceive the impact of mainstream rap music on their academic experiences. For the purpose of this study mainstream rap music is defined in two ways: a high profile subgenre of Hip Hop culture and, second, pervasively sexist, … Continue reading Sisters Rap the Blues: Examining the Perceived Impact of Rap Music on Black Women College Students

‘It’s Just a Lot More Casual’: Young Heterosexual Women’s Experience of Using Tinder in New Zealand

Abstract: Tinder is a mobile dating app that has recently taken off among young heterosexuals. While attracting great media attention, little scholarly work exists on the topic. In this paper we begin to address this gap by reporting on a small research project that examined five young heterosexual women’s experiences of using Tinder in New … Continue reading ‘It’s Just a Lot More Casual’: Young Heterosexual Women’s Experience of Using Tinder in New Zealand

Let’s Be Abominable Feminists: Yeti: Campus Stories and Sexism in the Digital College Party Scene

Abstract: Social media and mobile apps are increasingly a part of college culture and are being mobilized in the college party scene. Through the use of digital ethnography, this paper focuses on the app Yeti: Campus Stories to explore the role of social media apps in digital college party culture in perpetuating and potentially challenging … Continue reading Let’s Be Abominable Feminists: Yeti: Campus Stories and Sexism in the Digital College Party Scene

Computer Love: Replicating Social Order Through Early Computer Dating Systems

Abstract: Although online dating has only recently become culturally acceptable and widespread, using computers to make romantic matches has a long history. But rather than revolutionizing how people met and married, this article shows how early computerized dating systems re-inscribed conservative social norms about gender, race, class, and sexuality. It explores the mid-twentieth century origins … Continue reading Computer Love: Replicating Social Order Through Early Computer Dating Systems