Tag Archives: peer reviewed

Articles tags peer-reviewed have been reviewed through Ada’s open peer review process.

Thinking Beyond ‘Free Speech’ in Responding to Online Harassment

Abstract: Online harassment is a significant problem, and an important movement has emerged in response. However, this activism usually refers back to free speech discourse. I argue that an intersectional approach requires us to explore a more radical rethinking of the political traditions we draw on when responding to online harassment. Online harassment is a … Continue reading Thinking Beyond ‘Free Speech’ in Responding to Online Harassment

Dismantling ‘You Get What You Deserve’: Towards a Feminist Sociology of Revenge Porn

Abstract: With this research, we seek to formulate a feminist sociology of revenge porn, defined as the non-consensual circulation of intimate images with the intent to harm, to bring together two existing explanations for critical interrogation: that revenge porn is a gendered crime that disproportionately affects women and that these women get what they deserve. … Continue reading Dismantling ‘You Get What You Deserve’: Towards a Feminist Sociology of Revenge Porn

Black Deaths Matter? Sousveillance and the Invisibility of Black Life

Abstract: This article examines the shooting of Philando Castile, and his girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds’, decision to film his death at the hands of the police, in order to explore the potential of live-streaming applications as a form of “sousveillance” that can expose white supremacy from below. In highlighting the political economy constraints that limit the … Continue reading Black Deaths Matter? Sousveillance and the Invisibility of Black Life

Black Beauty and Digital Spaces: The New Visibility Politics

Abstract: Less than a year after the creation of the viral hashtag #BlackLivesMatter, an equally catchy and politically charged slogan surfaced: #BlackGirlMagic.  This latest hashtag insists on making black women’s bodies both visible and legible in contexts of beauty, desirability, and dignity. However, more needs to be said about how digital spaces have reified the … Continue reading Black Beauty and Digital Spaces: The New Visibility Politics

Sisters Rap the Blues: Examining the Perceived Impact of Rap Music on Black Women College Students

Abstract: The following qualitative study examines how Black women college students enrolled at a Predominately White Institution (PWI) perceive the impact of mainstream rap music on their academic experiences. For the purpose of this study mainstream rap music is defined in two ways: a high profile subgenre of Hip Hop culture and, second, pervasively sexist, … Continue reading Sisters Rap the Blues: Examining the Perceived Impact of Rap Music on Black Women College Students

‘It’s Just a Lot More Casual’: Young Heterosexual Women’s Experience of Using Tinder in New Zealand

Abstract: Tinder is a mobile dating app that has recently taken off among young heterosexuals. While attracting great media attention, little scholarly work exists on the topic. In this paper we begin to address this gap by reporting on a small research project that examined five young heterosexual women’s experiences of using Tinder in New … Continue reading ‘It’s Just a Lot More Casual’: Young Heterosexual Women’s Experience of Using Tinder in New Zealand

Let’s Be Abominable Feminists: Yeti: Campus Stories and Sexism in the Digital College Party Scene

Abstract: Social media and mobile apps are increasingly a part of college culture and are being mobilized in the college party scene. Through the use of digital ethnography, this paper focuses on the app Yeti: Campus Stories to explore the role of social media apps in digital college party culture in perpetuating and potentially challenging … Continue reading Let’s Be Abominable Feminists: Yeti: Campus Stories and Sexism in the Digital College Party Scene

Computer Love: Replicating Social Order Through Early Computer Dating Systems

Abstract: Although online dating has only recently become culturally acceptable and widespread, using computers to make romantic matches has a long history. But rather than revolutionizing how people met and married, this article shows how early computerized dating systems re-inscribed conservative social norms about gender, race, class, and sexuality. It explores the mid-twentieth century origins … Continue reading Computer Love: Replicating Social Order Through Early Computer Dating Systems

Gender Differences in Movie Superheroes’ Roles, Appearances, and Violence

Abstract: It is important to understand the content of media, as media can promote stereotypes that communicate what gender roles, appearances, and acts of violence are acceptable in society. This content analysis of 147 superheroes in 80 movies found that male heroes appeared much more frequently than female heroes. Females were more likely to work in … Continue reading Gender Differences in Movie Superheroes’ Roles, Appearances, and Violence

Bina48: Gender, Race, and Queer Artificial Life

By Shelleen M. Greene Abstract: Bina48, an artificial intelligence modeled after an African American woman, achieves radical political potential not by way of the trope of bodily transcendence and networked disembodiment, but rather, through her convergence of cybernetics, queer, and racial emancipatory politics toward possible hybrid, future constructions of self. Introduction: Bina48’s ‘Shadow’ Body In … Continue reading Bina48: Gender, Race, and Queer Artificial Life

Digitizing Books, Obscuring Women’s Work: Google Books, Librarians, and Ideologies of Access

By Anna Lauren Hoffmann and Raina Bloom Abstract: From a broad historical and cultural standpoint, Google Books concerns the imposition of ideals of technological rationality and efficiency typical of search engine technology onto entire collections of recorded human knowledge. As a large-scale information infrastructure, it radically reorganizes relations between the technologies, institutions, and individuals that … Continue reading Digitizing Books, Obscuring Women’s Work: Google Books, Librarians, and Ideologies of Access

Editing Diversity In: Reading Diversity Discourses on Wikipedia

By Maggie MacAulay and Rebecca Visser Abstract: Wikipedia has a diversity problem. The encyclopedia that ‘anyone can edit’ can only identify 13% of its editors as women, despite it being the seventh most visited site on the web with over 18 billion page views. Through individual grants, edit-a-thons, blog articles, and international conferences, the Wikimedia Foundation … Continue reading Editing Diversity In: Reading Diversity Discourses on Wikipedia

Critical Blogging: Constructing Femmescapes Online

By Andi Schwartz Abstract: By looking at two queer femme blogs, this paper argues that online spaces can be used as sites of political resistance and arenas for developing queer identities and communities. This paper frames blogging as political activity by using prefigurative politics and the concepts “queerscapes” and “virtual boundary publics.” Introduction A lot … Continue reading Critical Blogging: Constructing Femmescapes Online

Daddy Issues: Constructions of Fatherhood in The Last of Us and BioShock Infinite

Abstract: This paper examines the dadification of digital games, the trend in which players are positioned as father (figures). Comparing the way fatherhood is imagined in The Last of Us and BioShock Infinite on both ludological and representational registers reveals contesting constructs of masculinity with different relations to feminist politics. Pointing to the increasing prevalence … Continue reading Daddy Issues: Constructions of Fatherhood in The Last of Us and BioShock Infinite