Tag Archives: peer reviewed

Articles tags peer-reviewed have been reviewed through Ada’s open peer review process.

iEarth

iEarth offers a vision of natural spaces that are at the same time (wo)man-made while also bearing an imprint of a technological tool. Manufactured from a children’s diorama kit, these ‘unnatural landscapes’ dazzle with colour and lushness, displaying the kind of greenery that is more associated with media representations of nature than with ‘nature itself.’ … Continue reading iEarth

Opening Out from Open Access: Writing and Publishing in Response to Neoliberalism

Writing a short piece such as this doesn’t only focus the mind (quick, what’s my point? what am I trying to say?), it also directs it toward the process of writing. Right now, in this period we’re calling academic capitalism (or the neoliberalisation of life, the university and everything) there is, for me, nothing much … Continue reading Opening Out from Open Access: Writing and Publishing in Response to Neoliberalism

The Blind Shall See! The Question of Anonymity in Journal Peer Review

Whatever form it may take, the peer review of manuscripts submitted to scientific journals always has the same purpose: to proffer a totally objective opinion. This involves taking on the role of “modest witness”, that of a man of science unpolluted by his own subjectivity and corporeality, whose historical and political emergence was so well … Continue reading The Blind Shall See! The Question of Anonymity in Journal Peer Review

Watching the Detectives: Review’s Past and Present

Clapping and Counting: Assessment’s (Very Brief) Past Academia tends to have a fairly narrow view of its own administrative history, especially when it comes to the strange, epiphenomenal genres of assessment that underwrite it. Faculty assessment discourse—applicant dossiers, reader’s reports, letters of recommendation—all have an aura of deep entrenchment about them.  Like most of the … Continue reading Watching the Detectives: Review’s Past and Present

Feminist Journal Editing: Does This Job Include Benefits?

In the academic world, the issue of scholarly publication in journals always is a timely one for discussion. In my case, this is an especially opportune moment to reflect on journal editing and publishing. After 16 years as founding editor, and co-editor (with Cynthia Carter) of the international, peer-reviewed journal Feminist Media Studies (FMS), I … Continue reading Feminist Journal Editing: Does This Job Include Benefits?

Rethinking Peer Review in the Age of Digital Humanities

For academics, double-blind peer review processes remain the gold standard for validating scholarly work. The value accrued by scholarship has traditionally flowed mono-directionally from peer review. In the hierarchies that govern academic hiring and tenure and promotion practices, the single-authored monograph from the distinguished scholarly press sent out for review upon completion occupies a position … Continue reading Rethinking Peer Review in the Age of Digital Humanities

DHThis: An Experiment in Crowdsourcing Review in the Digital Humanities

In 2013, Martin Eve, Jesse Stommel, Roopika Risam, Alex Gil and I[1] launched DHThis.org, an experiment in crowdsourcing the “best” work in the digital humanities[2]. DHThis is the first entirely crowdsourced outlet for digital humanities (DH) news. There are no comparable models to DHThis. All existing sites which aggregate DH content still run on an … Continue reading DHThis: An Experiment in Crowdsourcing Review in the Digital Humanities

Science Fiction Feminisms, Feminist Science Fictions & Feminist Sustainability

Introduction The hospitality of Ada and Ada’s audiences is necessary to this essay. We offer our scholarly play among trans-spatial and trans-temporal webs and platforms as a practice of anticipation and even a quite serious fun that values not-quite-being-yet in sync, writing wise or conclusion wise. We quite like this demonstration of a collaboration that … Continue reading Science Fiction Feminisms, Feminist Science Fictions & Feminist Sustainability

Somatic Capitalism: Reproduction, Futurity, and Feminist Science Fiction

“Every technology is reproductive technology,” -Donna Haraway Reproductive futurism in the neoliberal present Suddenly, it feels a lot like 1984—not the iconic 1984 of Orwell’s dystopia, but the 1984 in which Margaret Atwood composed The Handmaid’s Tale. This was the same year that saw the release of the anti-abortion film The Silent Scream, and only … Continue reading Somatic Capitalism: Reproduction, Futurity, and Feminist Science Fiction

A Curious Doubled Existence: Birth Here and in Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan Saga

Lois McMaster Bujold’s science fiction (SF) relies on the symbiotic relationship between the technological and the social. This is often illustrated by the tension between the scientific and medicalized process of reproduction (via uterine replicators, cloning, and genetic modification) and the primal, ‘natural’ process. Varied levels of technological advancement and associated societal changes across the … Continue reading A Curious Doubled Existence: Birth Here and in Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan Saga

Toward a Zombie Epistemology: What it Means to Live and Die in Cabin in the Woods

Cabin in the Woods (dir. Joss Whedon, 2012) begins with fertility. The movie opens in the middle of the most banal of office scenes, with two white-shirted white men futzing around in a break room. Hadley complains about his ongoing conflict with his partner over their potential child, while Sitterson extracts a coffee from a … Continue reading Toward a Zombie Epistemology: What it Means to Live and Die in Cabin in the Woods

From Lab to Living Room: Transhumanist Imaginaries of Consumer Brain Wave Monitors

Introduction Advances in small components manufacturing have recently given rise to smallindustries offering a range of biometric devices to consumers, researchers, and DIY or “do-it-yourself” communities. These devices now include EEG (electroencephalography) or brain wave monitors, marketed as easily accessible, user friendly, affordable equipment, for use by broad markets of users in research, health care … Continue reading From Lab to Living Room: Transhumanist Imaginaries of Consumer Brain Wave Monitors

Creating Room For A Singularity of Our Own: Reading Sue Lange’s “We, Robots”

The Singularity will allow us to transcend these limitations [involving the rapid increase in intelligence] of our biological bodies and brains. . . . There will be no distinction post-Singularity between human and machine—Ray Kurzweil, The Singularity Is Near, (9) What’s it been three, four years, since the Regularity? The Regularity. When everything became regular, … Continue reading Creating Room For A Singularity of Our Own: Reading Sue Lange’s “We, Robots”

Emmy Noether, Maria Goeppert Mayer, and their Cyborgian Counterparts: Triangulating Mathematical-Theoretical Physics, Feminist Science Studies, and Feminist Science Fiction

Accompanying Materials Methodology & Intellectual Context Biography of Noether Biography of Goeppert Mayer On Speculative Science Fiction Epilog This essay contains a portmanteau of two strands of narratives from which the reader can choose his or her own critical engagement; either biographical or literary. The science fiction aspect of the narrative attempts a critique of … Continue reading Emmy Noether, Maria Goeppert Mayer, and their Cyborgian Counterparts: Triangulating Mathematical-Theoretical Physics, Feminist Science Studies, and Feminist Science Fiction